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01869 338890

A break from uni to help rescued elephants

Abi was training to be a nurse and decided to do something completely different during her summer holiday.

 

Abi Lay with one of her charges at the elephant refuge in Thailand where she volunteered"I ABSOLUTELY loved my time working with elephants; I'm considering going back next year after uni to stay for much longer :)

 

I don't really know how to put because it was all FAB! I nearly cried when I left and I was only there for one week!!! It was great! The centre were so welcoming and the staff are all great fun. The food was brilliant as well, so much choice, even for vegans! (plenty of fruit too :)

 

A typical day was: wake up around 6ish, have a bit of breakkie then head off to the elephants (there's 3 different areas) that your assigned to that day, feed them the plants that are there and wash them with a hose! Then that day there's usually a specific task to do (e.g. harvest which can be hard work but I really enjoyed it- beautiful scenery and a truck/tractor ride there and back-really fun). I also did a lot of tree planting in this time, then the elephants are fed again around 11.30 :) After that you're really sweaty so get a shower then lunch (yummy). In the afternoon there is also another task to do as well as washing the elephants and then there's the walk back to the jungle for some elephants which is always fun because there's a naughty baby elephant :) after that it's nice to walk around the wildlife centre and look at all the other animals :) dinners usually around 6.

 

The part that I found most rewarding was knowing how all the elephants (and the other wildlife) Abi Lay on her volunteer project at an elephant sanctuary in Thailand arranged by PoDwere treated before they had come to the centre and to see how happy they are now. A lot of them were close the death and now they're having a great time with all the staff and volunteers at the centre!

 

The part I found most challenging was coming back home!

 

Volunteering abroad is soooo much fun and I found it so rewarding. I wouldn't change a thing about my time there and would absolutely go back! It's great to meet new people who are interested in the same thing too!

 

I have already recommended PoD to others. When I compared prices with others, it was the cheapest and most of their money goes to the projects- unlike other companies!

Abi Lay's placement in Thailand was arranged with PoD.

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Comments

Anonymous

Elephants, like most herbivores, have sbmiiotyc bacteria in their gut that helps them break down their food. They are not born with these bacteria the only way for a calf to get them is to eat the faeces of its mother or other elephants. Some of the bacteria are excreted with the faeces, and by eating them the calf acquires the essential bacteria.Also, an elephant's digestive system is not very efficient. What comes out is not that much different from what goes in it still contains some nutritional value that the gut failed to extract. Therefore, an elephant can eat another elephant's (or its own) dung and gain some good from it. In order to compensate for this digestive inefficiency, elephants have to eat almost round the clock to ensure they get enough nutrition from their food.
Comment made: Thursday 10th May 2012

Anonymous

Elephants, like most herbivores, have sotbiymic bacteria in their gut that helps them break down their food. They are not born with these bacteria the only way for a calf to get them is to eat the faeces of its mother or other elephants. Some of the bacteria are excreted with the faeces, and by eating them the calf acquires the essential bacteria.Also, an elephant's digestive system is not very efficient. What comes out is not that much different from what goes in it still contains some nutritional value that the gut failed to extract. Therefore, an elephant can eat another elephant's (or its own) dung and gain some good from it. In order to compensate for this digestive inefficiency, elephants have to eat almost round the clock to ensure they get enough nutrition from their food.
Comment made: Monday 21st May 2012

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